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Keynote Lectures

Sensor Networks as the new Attack Target
Nancy Cam-Winget, Cisco Systems, United States

Mobile Edge Computing Empowers Internet of Things
Nirwan Ansari, New Jersey Institute of Technology, United States

Tracking our Lives - The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
Thomas Gilbert, Alexandra Institute, Denmark

 

Sensor Networks as the new Attack Target

Nancy Cam-Winget
Cisco Systems
United States
 

Brief Bio

Nancy Cam-Winget is a Distinguished Engineer at Cisco Systems where she works in the Security CTO Office. She currently focuses on IoT security, Cyber and identity-based security solutions.  Nancy was the product strategist and lead architect for Cisco’s Wi-Fi product group and lead security architect for Cisco’s Identity Services Engine and Platform Exchange Grid (pxGrid).  She has authored and acted as editor for multiple published standards such as IEEE 802.11i, 802.11w, 802.11r, 802.1X and IETF RFC 7170 and RFC 7171.

Nancy continues to be engaged in standards activities, where she’s now very active in other IoT standards forums and the IETF where she co-chairs the Managed Incident Lightweight Eschange.  She is also an editor for the Secure Automation and Continuous Monitoring group, is the security advisor for the Autonomic Network group, and a member of the IoT directorate.


Abstract
With the growing adoption and use of sensor networks, breaches in this space are publicized and growing, highlighting the importance of security. 

To cite a few examples:
• ATT’s 2015 Security report cites an increase of 458% in vulnerability scans against devices
• DHS’ annual report continues to cite over 200 reported breaches in the Industrial Control Systems disciplines
• There are many breaches publicized in the media today, but of importance is their impact.  The second publically reported breach to have greatly impacted a critical infrastructure came in December 2014 where a steel mill was breached in Germany where physical damage was incurred.

With such an attack surface expanding, how can these networks be secured?  What would the security solution look like?  This presentation will provide a general framework for how Security can be balanced with safety and availability.



 

 

Mobile Edge Computing Empowers Internet of Things

Nirwan Ansari
New Jersey Institute of Technology
United States
 

Brief Bio

Nirwan Ansari is Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT). He has also been a visiting (chair) professor at several universities such as High-level Visiting Scientist at Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications.

Professor Ansari is authoring Green Mobile Networks: A Networking Perspective (John Wiley, 2016) with T. Han, and co-authored two other books. He has also (co-)authored more than 500 technical publications, over one third published in widely cited journals/magazines. He has guest-edited a number of special issues covering various emerging topics in communications and networking. He has served on the editorial/advisory board of over ten journals. His current research focuses on green communications and networking, cloud computing, and various aspects of broadband networks.

Professor Ansari was elected to serve in the IEEE Communications Society (ComSoc) Board of Governors as a member-at-large, has chaired ComSoc technical committees, and has been actively organizing numerous IEEE International Conferences/Symposia/Workshops. He has frequently been delivering keynote addresses, distinguished lectures, tutorials, and invited talks. Some of his recognitions include IEEE Fellow, several Excellence in Teaching Awards, best paper awards, the NCE Excellence in Research Award, the ComSoc AHSN TC Outstanding Service Recognition Award, the NJ Inventors Hall of Fame Inventor of the Year Award, the Thomas Alva Edison Patent Award, Purdue University Outstanding Electrical and Computer Engineer Award, and designation as a COMSOC Distinguished Lecturer. He has also been granted over 30 U.S. patents.

He received a Ph.D. from Purdue University in 1988, an MSEE from the University of Michigan in 1983, and a BSEE (summa cum laude with a perfect GPA) from NJIT in 1982.


Abstract
Billions of smart devices, connected via the Internet, generate a massive amount of data streams (e.g., photos, videos, sensor information, etc.) over time. These data streams present unprecedented potentials for myriad applications and emerging services, and enabling timely analysis of this massive amount of data is the key to actualize these potentials, and thus to benefit the society as a whole. Traditionally, the data streams are processed in the centralized cloud by utilizing conventional big data analysis framework (e.g., Hadoop, Storm, etc.). However, transmitting the massive amount of data streams to the central cloud incurs unbearable network latency as well as instigates network traffic jams. Meanwhile, the utility of the data may be time sensitive, and subsequently erodes with time. Thus, it is critical to design an efficient networking architecture to sustainably handle the big data in real time. In this keynote, I will elicit the challenges on handling big data, and advocate a networking architecture, referred to as Mobile Edge Computing for Internet of Things (EdgeIoT), by bringing the computing resources close to the data and capitalizing on renewal energy sources.



 

 

Tracking our Lives - The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Thomas Gilbert
Alexandra Institute
Denmark
 

Brief Bio
Thomas Gilbert is a Senior Software/ICT Engineer in the Data Science and Engineering Lab at the Alexandra Institute, working with IoT, Big Data and Machine Learning. Thomas is a board member of the Danish IoT Forum and the co-chairs the IT council of the Danish Society of Engineers in Jutland. Thomas has a strong background working with IT in the industry but has for the past three years at the Alexandra Institute focused on IoT research and bringing research results and innovation to business. Thomas has worked on several FP7 projects, and has through them worked actively in the European Research Cluster on the Internet of Things. Currently Thomas is leading the Alexandra Institutes efforts on a H2020 for Internet of Things Large Scale Pilots and at the same time working to bring IoT technology into the hands of SME’s throughout Denmark.


Abstract
Today our whereabouts are tracked, and you don’t always who does it or when. Telco operators always know exactly where you are, and every time you purchase anything with a credit card your whereabouts are logged - and mass video surveillance is estimated to have grown some places to a point where there is one camera for every 14 citizens. Police cars in some countries are fitted to automatically scan license plates of all cars that it passes, and facial recognition means that we as individuals stand no chance of moving undetected in the public space.

We have become used to this, and we trust those who collect and store our personal data.

The surveillance and tracking systems in the future will be completely decentralised, and it may happen without us having a clue that is is taking place. Many of the apps we use on our phones track our movement, both when in use and when running in the background without our knowledge. From the moment we grant an app access to out GPS data, we have no control with what that information is used for, or where the information is sent. And this is before any malicious software is taken into account, which in some cases can monitor calls, read text messages, take pictures and send our
 
IoT Networks, cheap sensor technology and microcomputers make it possible for anyone to create a whole new type of surveillance system. Today, the phones and devices we carry with us everywhere work as telltale devices that broadcast who we are to our surroundings. IoT has now become main stream, meaning that anyone and everyone can create an advanced network of sensors distributed in the urban landscape that tracks the whereabouts of everyone.



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